Information and Communication Systems and Services: Curriculum

Here you'll find detailed information on current courses of the Bachelor's degree program Information and Communication Systems and Services. Please note that due to ongoing updates not all courses of the program might be fully displayed. A complete overview of the curriculum for the study year 2016/17 is going to be published in the course of the summer semester 2016.

1. Semester

Name ECTS
SWS
Module 11 Applied Mathematics 1 (MOD11)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Applied Mathematics 1 (DMA)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Introductory course focusing on elementary logic, sets, number systems, elements of number theory, relations and functions, sequences and series, combinatorics, difference equations, O-notation, vector spaces.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • state basic definitions and theorems accurately and in their own words, apply the methods acquired (possibly using a formulary) to solve mathematical problems relevant to IT, determine and give comprehensible reasons for the correctness, faultiness, and plausibility of a mathematical result;
  • formulate and write down facts using propositional calculus and set theory in a logically and formally correct way, represent numbers in different number systems und perform calculations in Z_m using finite field arithmetic;
  • analyze functions of one variable (e.g.,invertibility, boundedness, growth properties) and classify relations (e.g., equivalence relations and orderings);
  • solve basic enumeration problems using combinatorial tools (e.g,. sum and product rules, binomial coefficients);
  • investigate the convergence of sequences and (geometric) series and classify the growth of sequences or algorithms using big O notation;
  • perform basic operations in abstract vector spaces (e.g. checking for linear independence) and solve basic problems in two and three dimensional Euclidean space.

Course contents

  • Logic and sets
  • Number sets and number systems
  • Elements of number theory
  • Relations and functions
  • Sequences and series
  • Combinatorics
  • Difference equations
  • O-notation
  • Vector spaces

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • P. Hartmann (2014): Mathematik für Informatiker, Springer Vieweg
  • K. Rosen (2012): Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, McGraw-Hill
  • W. Struckmann, D. Wätjen (2006): Mathematik für Informatiker, Spektrum
  • G. Teschl, S. Teschl (2013): Mathematik für Informatiker 1, Springer Vieweg Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 12 Introduction to Computer Science (MOD12)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Introduction to Computer Science (GDI)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Fundamental aspects of Computer Sciences with emphasis on programing languages, development of programs and basic knowledge about algorithms.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • explain information representation and processing on computer systems;
  • explain the conception and elements of formal languages;
  • explain paradigms and elements of selected programming languages;
  • work with Linux at command line level using a shell;
  • port developed programs under Linux using gcc and gdb;
  • explain and use basic dynamic data structures;
  • explain, to choose, and to use selected algorithms for sorting and searching.

Course contents

  • Basic structure of computer systems
  • Programing environment
  • Representation of numbers, coding, binary arithmetic
  • Paradigms and elements of selected programing languages
  • Concepts and elements of formal languages
  • Operating system LINUX (basics)
  • Compiler gcc and debugger gdb
  • Basic dynamic data structures
  • Basic algorithms for searching data
  • Basic algorithms for sorting data

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • J. E. Hopcroft, R. Motwani, J. D. Ullmann (2002): Einführung in die Automatentheorie, formale Sprachen und Komplexitätstheorie, Addison-Wesley
  • D. E. Knuth (2001): The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 1, Fundamental Algorithms, Addison Wesley
  • T. Cormen (2001): Introduction to Algorithms, McGraw-Hill
  • M. Kofler (2010): Linux 2010, Addison Wesley
  • A. Griffith (2002): GCC: The complete reference, McGraw-Hill/Osborne
  • W.R. Stevens, S.A. Rago (2005), Advanced programming in the UNIX environment, 2nd edition, Addison WesleyLearning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 13 Computer Architechture (MOD13)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Computer Architecture (COA)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Fundamentals of Computer Architecture based on contemporary logic design.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • specify, to depict, and to analyze combinational logic function as well as to synthesize combinational logic function by means of basic gates and to optimize the result by applying standardized methods;
  • design and to apply simple integer arithmetic systems;
  • specify sequential logic systems;
  • apply the model of the clocked finite state machine;
  • explicate the hardware and the instruction set architecture of basic central processing units;
  • analyze and to evaluate an instruction set architecture in terms of the equirements of an imperative high level programming language, e.g., the C language.

Course contents

  • Basic gates and elementary logic rules
  • Types of notation, description, and specification, analysis, synthesis, and optimization of combinational logic functions
  • Integer arithmetic (binary numbers, signed and unsigned integers, condition codes = flags, extension, addition, and subtraction)
  • Combinational adder and subtractor, flag-logic
  • Optional: combinational multiplier
  • Specification of sequential logic systems
  • Finite automaton (FA), finite state machine (FSM)
  • Clocked systems: D-type flip-flop, D-type register, counter, shift register
  • Synthesis of synchronous (clocked) FSMs
  • Optional: synchronous pipeline processing
  • Optional: adder-shifter-based multiplier
  • Architecture of microcomputers
  • Processor architectures, CPU hardware model
  • CPU instruction set architecture
  • Optional: instruction pipelining, cache

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • R. Katz, et al. (2004): Contemporary Logic Design, Prentice Hall
  • J. D. Carpinelli (2001): Computer Systems Organization & Architecture, Pearson Addison Wesley Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 14 Programming (MOD14)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Programming (PRG)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

This course focusses on the fundamentals of the C programming language.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • explain the essential language constructs of the C programming language;
  • derive an algorithm with appropriate control- anddata structures for a given problem;
  • implement a syntactically and semantically correct algorithm in the C programming language using the Visual C compiler;
  • explain C source code written by someone else.

Course contents

  • programming
  • loops
  • decisions
  • functions
  • modules
  • pointers
  • data structures
  • libraries

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • M. Dausmann, U. Bröckl, J. Goll, D. Schoop (2011): C als erste Programmiersprache, Vieweg+Teubner Verlag
  • B. Kernighan, D. Ritchie (1990): Programmieren in C, Hanser VerlagLearning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method and final exam

Anmerkungen

Tool used: Visual Studio Express™

Module 15 Personal and Social-Communicative Basic Skills (MOD15)
German / kMod
6.00
-
Professional and Social Communication (PSC)
English / SE
3.00
2.00

Course description

This course aims at brushing up all the English language skills required for professional and social interaction. Starting from the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages B1+, language structures and vocabulary are revised, developed, and practised in all four skills – listening, reading, speaking and writing.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • act and respond appropriately in private situations and in international contexts;
  • initiate and cultivate professional contacts;
  • successfully apply the four skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) in professional situations.

Course contents

  • Autobiography
  • Small talk
  • Everyday situations
  • Discussions of topic of general relevance
  • Persuasive speaking and writing

Prerequisites

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Level B1+

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • J. B. Strother et al. (2012): Information Overload: An International Challenge for Professional Engineers and Technical Communicators, John Wiley & Sons Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes
  • O. Maderdonner et al. (2014): Personal and Social Communication, Skriptum
  • P. Connolly, P. Kingsbury et al. (2014): eSNACK, Lernplattform

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Working in Teams (AIT)
German / SE
3.00
2.00

Course description

In the course the participants get to know their fellow students, the content of the study and the organization of the University of Applied Sciences Technikum Wien. The course prepares students for teamwork in their studies and in their professional work.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • use constructive feedback in new team situations and in team conflicts;
  • explain team roles (e.g., Belbin) and to identifythem in simple practical examples;
  • take on an active, reflecting role in new structures (team, organization, study program);
  • explain models of team development (e.g.,Tuckman) and to derive interventions for their own practice;
  • develop team rules and to implement them.

Course contents

  • Content of the study and organization of the study program
  • Formulation of expectations
  • Characteristics and success criteria of effective teamwork
  • Team development
  • Team roles and preferred team roles and potential for development
  • Team rules
  • Target agreements
  • Flow of information - efficiently and actively developed
  • Structure of personalities in team processes
  • Preferred team roles and personal potential for development
  • Constructive feedback

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • S. Franken (2010): Verhaltensorientierte Führung – Handeln, Lernen und Diversity in Unternehmen, Verlag Gabler
  • Ch. V. Haug (2009): Erfolgreich im Team. Praxisnahe Anregungen für effizientes Teamcoaching und Projektarbeit, dtv-Verlag
  • R. Niermeyer (2008): Teams führen, Haufe Verlag
  • R. van Dick, M. A. West (2005): Teamwork, Teamdiagnose, Teamentwicklung, Verlag Hogrefe
  • L. Werth (2004): Psychologie für die Wirtschaft. Grundlagen und Anwendungen, Spektrum Akademischer Verlag Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method

2. Semester

Name ECTS
SWS
Module 21 Applied Mathematics 2 (MOD21)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Applied Mathematics 2 (MAT)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Introductory course focusing on matrices and linear transformations, systems of linear equations, introduction to graph theory, calculus, probability, descriptive and inferential statistics.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • solve systems of linear equations with methods from linear algebra (e.g., Gaussian elimination) and perform geometric operations (e.g., rotations, reflections) with the help of linear maps;
  • model problems using directed and undirected graphs and solve optimization problems (e.g., minimal spanning trees, shortest paths) with appropriate algorithms (e.g., Kruskal, Dijkstra);
  • apply methods from differential and integral calculus to analyze, sketch, and approximate (Taylor series) functions as well as to compute characteristic values, coefficients, areas, etc.;
  • apply methods from probability theory and statistics to describe one-dimensional samples, compute probabilities with the help of discrete and continuous random variables, and perform basic statistical hypothesis testing and estimating.

Course contents

  • Matrices and linear transformations
  • Systems of linear equations
  • Introduction to graph theory (trees, shortest paths, minimal spanning trees)
  • Calculus (limits, derivatives, Taylor series, integrals and applications)
  • Probability and statistics (descriptive statistics, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, introduction to confidence intervals and testing of hypotheses)

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of logic, sets, functions, sequences and series, combinatorics, vector spaces.

Literature

  • J. L. Gross, J. Yellen, P. Zhang (2014): Handbook of Graph Theory, CRC Press
  • P. Hartmann (2014): Mathematik für Informatiker, Springer Vieweg
  • M. Sachs (2013): Wahrscheinlichkeitsrechnung und Statistik, Hanser
  • P. Stingl (2009): Mathematik für Fachhochschulen: Technik und Informatik
  • G. Teschl, S. Teschl (2013, 2014): Mathematik für Informatiker 1 und 2, Springer Vieweg
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method

Anmerkungen

none

Module 22 Operating Systems (MOD22)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Operating Systems (BES)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Operating systems basics and introduction to systems programming

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • list and explain the fundamental theoretical concepts of operating systems like process models, scheduling, memory management, inter-process communication, deadlocks, input-output, file systems, and security;
  • analyze, evaluate, and compare existing operating systems with respect to these fundamental concepts;
  • classify existing operating systems based on their structure into monolithic operating systems, layered operating systems, microkernel operating systems, virtual machines, and exokernels;
  • develop simple programs in the C programming language in a UNIX/Linux programming environment using tools like C-compilers, linkers, and the 'make' utility for automated builds of the program executable;
  • apply the above fundamental theoretical concepts in those simple programs covering file system interactions (opening directories, reading directory entries, closing directories, and retrieving I-node information), accessing user and group management data bases, process creation and termination, inter-process communication with unnamed pipes and shared memory, and process synchronization with semaphores.

Course contents

  • Fundamental concepts of operating systems including process models, scheduling, memory management, inter-process communication, deadlocks, input-output, file systems, and security
  • General structures of operating systems (monolithic, layered, microkernel, virtual machines, and exokernels)
  • Software development in the UNIX/Linux environment including separation of the software into individual translation units, automated build of executables using the make utility, use of libraries
  • System programming in the UNIX/Linux environment covering inter-process communication with implicit (unnamed pipes) and explicit (semaphores and shared memory) synchronization, process creation and termination (fork, wait), file system interaction (opendir, readir,closedir, lstat, readlink), and user/group management (getpwnam, getpwuid, getgrnam, getgrgid)

Prerequisites

- Profound programming skills using the C language - Basic skills in handling Linux (shell commands, etc.)

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • A. Tanenbaum (2015): Modern Operating Systems, Pearson
  • W. Stallings (2015): Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles, Pearson
  • W. R. Stevens, St. A. Rago (2013): Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment, Addison Wesley Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 23 Computer Networks (MOD23)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Computer Networks (CNW)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

This course covers basic aspects relating to computer networks and the most commonly used protocols

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • outline the OSI Layer Model and to categorize functionalities as well as network devices and protocols;
  • plan networks independently and to figure out a proper subnetting if necessary;
  • explain how data packets are getting routed through networks and compare the different methods;
  • describe the structure and operation of the most commonly used network protocols of the TCP/IP protocol suite;
  • compare the characteristics of wireless communication- , authentication- and encryption standards
  • configure and secure a wireless network.

Course contents

  • OSI Model
  • TCP/IP core protocols
  • Switching & Routing
  • Functionality of network devices
  • VLANs
  • WLAN standards
  • Introduction to network programming using Python
  • Practical exercises (sniffer, tools: ping, traceroute, netstat, ...)

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • C. Kozierok. (2004): TCP/IP Guide, No Starch Press
  • T. Lammle. (2009): CompTIA Network+, Wiley Publishing Inc. Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 24 Object Oriented Methods (MOD24)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Object Oriented Methods (OOM)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

In this course a method for creating requirements specifications based on the Unified Modeling Language and object-oriented design and programming based on C# will be taught.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • describe the software life cycle;
  • define object-oriented terminology;
  • define and interpret UML artifacts;
  • develop UML diagrams (use case diagram, class diagram, activity. diagram, interaction diagram) using checklists and a UML tool;
  • summarize the diagrams in a complete requirements specification;
  • design and implement basic object-oriented systems;
  • apply version control, issue tracking and unit testing in the scope of software projects.

Course contents

  • Software Life Cycle
  • Requirements specification / Functional specification
  • Object-oriented analysis
  • Object-oriented design
  • Object-oriented programming
  • Visualization using UML

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of any computer language

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • H. Balzert (2004 bzw. 2011), Lehrbuch der Objektmodellierung, Analyse und Entwurf mit der UML 2, Spektrum Akademischer Verlag Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes
  • C# Programming Guide

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method and final exam

Anmerkungen

Tools used: Visual Studio (Community Edition), Enterprise ArchitectTM

Module 25 Information Exchange and Brokering (MOD25)
German / kMod
6.00
-
Presentation and Rhetoric (PBG)
German / SE
3.00
2.00

Course description

In this course the students learn to present issues and facts in a target-oriented way.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • present a given set of facts in free speech in a structured manner (optionally with a keyword-list);
  • prepare simple technical issues for specific target groups (especially for "non-technicians");
  • use different versions of the entry and exit in the presentation

Course contents

  • Preparing, structuring and reducing information
  • Targets and structure of a presentation
  • Media and media use
  • Structuring subsidies
  • Body language, language and voice
  • Dealing with questions from the audience

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • W. Bilinski (2006): Rhetorik - das Trainingsbuch, Verlag Haufe
  • M. Hartmann, R. Funk, H. Nietmann (2012): Präsentieren, Verlag Beltz
  • E. Hierhold (2005): Sicher präsentieren, wirksamer vortragen, Redline Wirtschaft, Ueberreuter
  • M. Lehner (2013): Viel Stoff - wenig Zeit, Haupt Verlag
  • G. Schilling (2006): Angewandte Rhetorik und Präsentationstechnik, Schilling
  • H. Will (2006): Mini-Handbuch Vortrag und Präsentation, Verlag Beltz Learning materials:

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method

Anmerkungen

none

Technical and Creative Communication (ENG)
English / SE
3.00
2.00

Course description

Starting from the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages B1+, we aim at developing and strengthening the vocabulary of the students’ field of study along with the language skills required for technical and creative communication

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • structure and describe a technical process in English for a given target group;
  • illustrate and explain abstract technical conceptsthrough real-life examples;
  • analyze and interpret literary texts in the English language.

Course contents

  • distinguishing the three main types (informative,persuasive, and experiential) of discourse
  • audience adaptation in terms of language and content
  • impact analysis
  • technical process descriptions
  • use of persuasive language
  • analysis and interpretation of literary texts

Prerequisites

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Level B1+

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • R. Johnson-Sheehan (2014): Technical Communication Strategies for Today, Pearson Education Ltd. Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes
  • O. Maderdonner et al. (2014): Personal and Social Communication, Skriptum
  • P. Connolly, P. Kingsbury et al. (2014): eSNACK, Lernplattform

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method

3. Semester

Name ECTS
SWS
Module 31 Cryptography and Coding Theory (MOD31)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Cryptography and Coding Theory (KCT)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

This course introduces mathematical foundations, ideas and applications of modern cryptography and coding theory focusing on classical ciphers, modern block ciphers, public key cryptosystems, introduction to elliptic curve cryptography, sourcecoding, and channel coding with special emphasis on linear codes.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • analyze sets and binary operations with respect to their algebraic structure (groups, rings, fields) and explain their relevance for cryptography and coding theory, and to apply methods from number theory and algebra to data encryption;
  • explain the mathematical structure, operating modes, and applications (e.g., Feistel network, arithmetic in Galois fields, RSA algorithm, elliptic curve cryptography) of classical and modern block ciphers as well as public key algorithms and assess their security;
  • explain examples of ideas and methods for cryptographic attacks (e.g., statistical analysis, factorizing primes) and apply basic cryptanalytic techniques in concrete situations;
  • apply methods of lossless source coding to construct optimal prefix codes and assess the compression level achieved using the notion of entropy.

Course contents

  • Algebraic structures and modular arithmetic
  • Classical ciphers (mono- and polyalphabetic ciphers, one-time pad)
  • Modern block ciphers (DES, AES) and applications (e.g. cryptographic hash functions, password-encryption)
  • Diffie-Hellman key exchange
  • Public key cryptosystems (El Gamal cryptosystem, RSA) and applications (e.g. digital signature, authentification), problems and solutions (e.g. man-in-the middle-attack, certification authorities, web of trust)
  • Introduction to elliptic curve cryptography
  • Source coding (information and entropy, Huffman encoding, Shannon's First Theorem)
  • Channel coding (decision rules, error detection and error correction, Shannon's Theorem, linear codes, cyclic codes)

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of logic, sets, elementary number theory, functions, sequences and series, combinatorics, vector spaces, matrices, systems of linear equations, calculus, probability and statistics.

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • Ch. Paar, J. Pelzl (2014): Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners, Springer
  • D. Schönfeld, H. Klimant, R. Piotraschke (2012): Informations- und Kodierungstheorie, Springer
  • K. Freiermuth, J. Hromkovic, B. Steffen (2014): Einführung in die Kryptologie, Springer
  • S. M. Moser, P. Chen (2012): A Student ́s Guide to Coding and Information Theory, Cambridge University Press Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 32 Distributed Systems (MOD32)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Distributed Systems (VCS)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

This lecture conveys basic knowledge of distributed systems focusing on TCP/IP, fault tolerance, and Java.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • explain the subtasks/layers of distributed systems and describe their interrelations;
  • characterize the specific challenges of fault tolerance and compare the pros and cons of the individual solution approaches;
  • design and to implement a simple distributed system;
  • relate those aspects of the Java ecosystem that are relevant for distributed systems to the subtasks and describe them.

Course contents

  • Principles and concepts: Layers, transparency, scalability
  • Communication: Middleware, RPC, RMI, Messaging
  • Operating system support: Client/Server, virtualization
  • Naming: Name Service, Directory Service, Location Service
  • TCP/IP Client/Server: Architecture and programming
  • Clocks and agreement: Physical and logical clocks, mutex, election
  • Consistency and replication: : Primary backup, Quorum, Epidemic Protocols
  • Fault tolerance: Dependability, Redundancy, Agreement, Group Communication
  • Java: RMI, Reflection, EJB

Prerequisites

- Knowledge of object-oriented programming and implementation skills - Knowledge of operating systems and system programming

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • A. Tanenbaum, M. van Steen (2006): Distributed Systems, Prentice-Hall
  • G. Coulouris, J. Dollimore, T. Kindberg, G. Blair(2011): Distributed Systems, Addison Wesley Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 33 Embedded Systems Software (MOD33)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Embedded Systems Software (ESS)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Low-level software development for embedded systems

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • completely control external and internal peripheral modules interfaced by memory mapping, IO-mapping or serial interfaces like I2C, SPI and UART in the programming language C, while utilizing API functions;
  • understand, to develop on their own, to debug and to test the control of such peripherals;
  • consider typical criteria in terms of embedded programming, e.g., resource efficiency, real-time capability, and time-precision;
  • implement correct and efficient solutions utilizing interrupts and associated concepts (nesting, non-nesting, priority);
  • solving problems as stand-alone programs or byusing a pre-configured operating systems for embedded systems (real-time operating systems);
  • integrate microcontrollers in sensor/actuator systems to setup a reactive system.

Course contents

  • Embedded Systems Survey
  • Software for Embedded Systems
  • Microcontroller
  • Basic peripherals (ports, timer, interrupts)
  • Optional peripherals (ADC, PWM, etc.)
  • Hardware-Driver programming
  • API, software modularization
  • Platform specific RTOS

Prerequisites

Profound knowledge of programming using the C language. Single-handed development of algorithms to solve basic problems.

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • W. A. Smith (2008): C Programming for Embedded Microcontrollers, Elektor International Media BV
  • J. Yiu (2014): The Definitive Guide to ARM Cortex-M3 and Cortex-M4 Processors
  • M. Barr (1999): Programming Embedded Systems in C and C++, O'Reilly Media, Inc. Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes
  • API zur TIVAWARE Treiberbibliothek, Texas Instruments (2014)
  • ARM Infocenter - elaborierte Dokumentation zu ARM CPUs, (http://infocenter.arm.com/)

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 34 Object Oriented Development of Applications (MOD34)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Object Oriented Development of Applications (ODE)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Development and implementation of a Java based communication or network service.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • implement exercises with Object Oriented Technologies in Java;
  • make efficient and productive use of the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and its features when developing Applications in Java;
  • create Grafical User Interfaces (GUI) using JavaFX;
  • develop network-based services in Java using TCP/UDP;
  • create Java web applications with Servlets/JSP/JSF;
  • test Java software modules with jUnit.

Course contents

  • Java basics and OOP
  • Exception Handling, Loging and Testing (jUnit)
  • Streams, Java I/O and network programming with sockets
  • GUI design (JavaFX)
  • Web programming (Servlets, Java Server Pages, Java Server Faces)
  • Advanced JAVA (Threads, Reflection, XML, Patterns)

Prerequisites

- Programming principles (loops, conditions, variables, ...) - OO Basics (class, object, interfaces, inheritance, ...) - Network basics (TCP/IP, UDP, Client/Server, Email, ...)

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • K. Arnold, J. Gosling, D. Holmes (2008): The Java Programming Language, Fourth Edition, Addison Wesley
  • G. Krüger (2009): Handbuch der Java Programmierung, Addison-Wesley
  • K. Sierra, B. Bates (2008): SCJP – Sun Certified Programmer For Java 6 Study Guide, Mc Graw Hill
  • C. Ullenboom (2011): Java ist auch eine Insel. Das umfassende Handbuch, Galileo Press Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 35 Scientific Working (MOD35)
German / kMod
6.00
-
Scientific Practice (WIP)
German / SE
3.00
2.00

Course description

This lecture conveys basic knowledge of scientific writing, provides a basis for the bachelor thesis, and provides for practicing in the course of a simulated scientific conference.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • autonomously write a scientific paper/thesis at bachelor level, adhere to the code of ethics, and to deliberate this process;
  • review a different scientific paper/thesis;
  • present a scientific paper/thesis.

Course contents

  • Scientific working and literature research
  • Writing: Structure and Citations
  • Peer review
  • Ethics and good pratice, plagiarism
  • Effective short presentations

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • J. Zobel (2009): Writing for Computer Science, Springer.
  • B. Pyerin (2014): Kreatives wissenschaftliches Schreiben, Beltz Juventa Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes
  • articles and relevant web sites.

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method >
Scientific Writing and Engineering Ethics (SCW)
English / SE
3.00
2.00

Course description

This course aim at conveying the language-related and formal criteria required for short scientific papers, together with the discussion of ethics concepts in the professional sphere and the analysis of real-life case studies.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • cite other authors’ work in compliance with paper guidelines;
  • structure and write short scientific papers according to the language-related and formal criteria given;
  • formulate and justify a rationally defendable position on basic ethical problems;
  • analyze ethical dilemmas in case studies.

Course contents

  • Structuring a scientific paper
  • Correct citation of other authors’ findings
  • Language-related peculiarities of a scientific paper
  • Principles of ethical judgement
  • Different approaches to ethics
  • Case studies.

Prerequisites

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Level B2

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • A. Wallwork (2011): English for Writing Research Papers, Springer
  • O. C. Ferrell (1999): Business Ethics: Ethical Decision Making and Cases, Houghton Mifflin Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes
  • M. Göschka et al. (2014) Guidelines for Scientific Writing, Skriptum
  • O. Maderdonner et al. (2014): Ethics, Skriptu

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method

4. Semester

Name ECTS
SWS
Module 41 Information Technologies (MOD41)
German / kMod
6.00
-
IT Security (ITSEC)
German / UE, FL
3.00
2.00

Course description

The lecture offers an overview of the fundamentals of IT-security and deals with crypto methods, access control, network security, internet security as well as actual threats.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • ...
  • differentiate and to characterize cryptographic methods in reference to the basic information security attributes;
  • distinguish mechanisms, concepts and models for access control using identification, authentication and authorization also in distributed environments;
  • identify requirements of communication security (networks, services, distributed systems) and to describe methods and protocols needed;
  • categorize common vulnerabilities and threats on the basis of actual incidents and map them to security measures.

Course contents

  • Consolidation of crypto methods (symmetric vs. asymmetric algorithms, signatures, authenticity, key-management and –infrastructures)
  • Access control (identification and authentification, AAA-systems in distributed environments, single sign on, autorisation and rights-management, security concepts and models, trusted computing, firewalls and ids)
  • Network security (categorisation, OSI-security architecture, security problems of TCP/IP, tunneling-protocols (L2TP, IPsec/IKE, TLS), mechanisms and applications (SSH, S/MIME, PGP), wlan-security, security issues of internet services and web-applications)
  • Actual threats (secure programming, malware, actual reports)

Prerequisites

- Profound knowledge of cryptography and information theory - Profound knowledge of operating systems, computer networks, and distributed systems

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • C. Eckert (2006): IT-Sicherheit: Konzepte – Verfahren – Protokolle, Oldenburg
  • S. Harris (2012): Cissp All-In-One Exam Guide, McGraw-Hill/Osborne Media Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method and final exam
Information Engineering (IE)
German / UE, FL
3.00
2.00
Module 42 Communication Technologies (MOD42)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Telecommunication and Mobile Communications (TMC)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Principle of current Technologies and Architectures in Telecommunication and Mobile Communication

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • ...
  • describe and compare the current broadband access technologies;
  • explain the current backbone networks technologies and contrast their benefits and drawback over alternative technologies;
  • describe and to explain signaling processes in telecommunication networks;
  • contrast and describe the generations of mobile networks and their architectures;
  • explain digital modulation and multiple access systems which are used in mobile communication.

Course contents

  • Broadband Access Technologies
  • Optical Networks
  • Transport Networks
  • Multiprotocol Label Switching
  • Session Initiation Protocol
  • Global System for Mobile Communication
  • General Packet Radio Service
  • Universal Mobile Telecommunication System
  • Long Term Evolution
  • Fixed Mobile Convergence
  • Digital Modulation
  • Multiple Access Systems

Prerequisites

- Profound knowledge of TCP/IP - Profound knowledge of computer networks - Profound knowledge of switching and routing

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • W. Stallings (2010): Data and computer communications, Prentice Hall
  • M. Sauter (2013): Grundkurs Mobile Kommunikationssysteme, Vieweg
  • M. Poikselkä, G. Mayer (2013): The IMS: IP Multimedia Concepts and Services, Wiley Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 43 Intelligent Systems (MOD43)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Embedded Systems Engineering (ESE)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

In this project-based course students work on tasks and problems related to intelligent systems (embedded systems, smart systems, etc.)

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • implement a simple complex embedded Systems project (approx. 1 person month);
  • use and if necessary adapt complex software libraries for embedded system projects;
  • compose subsystems to complex (distributed) systems considering communication requirements;
  • select, define, integrate, and adapt COTS and non-COTS components for embedded systems.

Course contents

  • Project implementation

Prerequisites

Project dependent, usually profound knowledge of software design for embedded systems, operating systems, and distributed systems.

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • Project dependent Learning materials:
  • Project dependen

Assessment methods

  • project progress
  • proof of function
  • project presentation
Module 44 Software Architectures and Middleware Technologies (MOD44)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Software Architecture and Middleware Technologies (SAM)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

This lecture covers software architectures supported by current middleware technologies. The theoretical content is exercised further in the course of a practical project.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • develop a software architecture for a new software in the area of information and communication systems;
  • appropriately apply current middleware technologies, e.g., Java Enterprise, Web Service, Group Communication, within Software design and implementation;
  • break down complex requirements into separatetasks and develop the solution based on appropriate methodologies within a team;
  • integrate enterprise applications using integration technologies such as web services.

Course contents

  • Software architectures: Overview of current and new concepts (object-oriented, event-based, component-based, SOA, ...)
  • Java Enterprise: architecture, overview of persistence approaches, JPA basics
  • XML and Web Services: basics on XML in order to discuss the application in the area of Web Services.
  • Web Services with Java: Implementation of Web Services within the Java Enterprise stack.
  • .NET: WCF as alternative Web Service implementation – interoperability and integration aspects – concepts vs. technologies
  • Message-oriented Middleware: Message Routing and Transformation
  • Architectures for scalable and fault tolerant large scale applications, e.g., Internet-scale.
  • Component-based Software Engineering: Standards, life cycle, COTS, processes and management
  • Distributed Transactions: Concurrency control, locking, recovery, 2PC, loosely coupled transactions
  • Lab project

Prerequisites

- Basics of object-oriented programming using Java - Basics of distributed computing

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • A. Tanenbaum, M. van Steen (2006): Distributed Systems, Prentice Hall International
  • G. Hohpe, B. Woolf (2003): Enterprise Integration Patterns, Addison-Wesley
  • M. Fowler (2002): Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture, Addison-Wesley Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 45 Database Systems (MOD45)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Database Systems (DBS)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

This lecture conveys knowledge of relational databases (design, queries, and programming) and delves into them as part of a lab project.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • explain the relational model and the entity relationship model;
  • design and implement a relational database;
  • issue SQL queries with correlated nested queries;
  • explain the concepts of database programming and implement a simple database-backed web application.

Course contents

  • Basics: Codd’s rules, ANSI_SPARC architecture, transactions
  • Entity relationship (ER) model and relational model
  • Relational database design
  • Database implementation with SQL-DDL
  • Interactive work with SQL-IDL and SQL-DML
  • Persistence and database programming
  • Cursor-concept and embedded SQL
  • Database programming with Java: JDBC and SQLJ
  • Database backed web applications with Java: Servlets and JSP

Prerequisites

- First-order logic basics - Proper knowledge of object oriented analysis and design

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • G. Saake, K. U. Sattler, A.Heuer (2013): Datenbanken: Konzepte und Sprachen, mitp-Professional
  • R. A. Elmasri, S. B. Navathe(2010): Fundamentals of Database Systems, Addison-Wesley Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method

5. Semester

Name ECTS
SWS
Module 51 Information and Communication Technologies 1 (MOD51)
German / kMod
18.00
-
Internship 1 (BPR)
German / SO
6.00
0.00

Course description

Relevant activities in a vocational context to support entry into professional life. Existing and verifiable vocational activities (if relevant) will be recognized.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • work independently on tasks in an occupational context and to do the required documentation;
  • apply their knowledge and expertise acquired in the course of their studies;
  • reflect the occupational practice in terms of technical, economical, and organizational aspects, as well as from a management and social perspective.

Course contents

  • Internship related

Prerequisites

Internship related

Literature

  • n/a

Assessment methods

  • Successfully / not successfully completed

Anmerkungen

If an internship has to be carried out, Internship 1 and Internship 2 will be combined to a 12 ECTS-point / 8 week full-time-equivalent internship to be carried out in the 3rd year of studies.

Specialization 1 (SPE)
German / SO
12.00
5.00

Course description

Students work in small groups on topics in the field of information and communication technologies relevant to scientific state-of-the-art and industrial practice. This exemplary emphasis builds the practice-oriented foundation for the first bachelor thesis, which is carried out individually by every student.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • familiarize themselves with new topics in a comprehensive and thorough way;
  • apply the knowledge and expertise gained with regard to dedicated problem statements;
  • apply scientific founded, systematic methods of solving problems;
  • write a bachelor thesis with a clear structure and layout, in an elaborate language, and with relevant citations.

Course contents

  • Familiarization with a (new) topic and write the first bachelor thesis

Prerequisites

Topic dependent

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • Topic dependent Learning materials:
  • Topic dependent

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method and approbation of the bachelor thesis

Anmerkungen

Topic selection and forming the student groups usually takes place in the second half of the 4th term.

Module 52 Business (MOD52)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Selected Topics in Business Administration (BWL)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

This course focuses on core concepts and techniques of accounting used to assist management in planning and decision making processes. Topics covered are preparing financial statements (balance sheet, P&L), calculating financial ratios, reading and interpretation of financial statements and basic concepts of cost accounting. In the simulation activity TOPSIM students are able to practice and refine their acquired knowledge and skills.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • explain the role and importance of accounting in the decision-making-process in a business organization;
  • describe the relationship of financial statementselements (e.g., assets, liabilities) as well as the relationship between the balance sheet and income statement;
  • calculate and describe how a financial transaction (e.g., depreciation, accruals) affects the balance sheet and income statement;
  • prepare a balance sheet and Profit & Loss Account (P&L);
  • interpret accounts calculating key financial ratios using published annual reports of corporations;
  • determine cost elements, make calculations using basic managerial accounting concepts such as break even, contribution margin, etc. in order to make business decisions;
  • recognize interrelationships between different business areas, are able to analyze comprehensive internal/external data, make business decisions, evaluate and justify results while acting as manager for a simulated business.

Course contents

  • Purpose and role of accounting
  • Structure of the balance sheet and income statement
  • Year-end adjustment (e.g., accruals, bad debts) and how they affect business results
  • Financial ratios and interpretation of accounts
  • Basic concepts of managerial accounting: cost elements, cost allocation & calculation, break-even point, contribution analysis, etc.
  • Business objectives & strategies
  • Market – and competitors analysis, marketing mix
  • Procurement & production

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • M. Wünsche (2007): BWL für IT Berufe. Ein praxisorientierter Leitfaden für kfm. Berufsfelder, Vieweg
  • I. Dobrovits I., K. Konczer (2011): Accounting and Management Control I: Grundlagen der externen Unternehmensrechnung, Verlag Grelldenk Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Module 53 Management (MOD53)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Project, Process and Quality Management (PPQ)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

Starting from the basic definitions of Project, Process and Quality Management adequate tools and techniques for System and Software Development (e.g., Project Planning and – Control, Software Testing and Development, Process Tailoring) are imparted. Specific Application examples highlight practical benefits of the said management systems.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • explain basic concepts, tools and techniques of project, process and quality management;
  • design, implement, and control project charter, work breakdown structure, time schedule, resource plan, budget plan, and risk management plan for elementary cases;
  • identify concrete software quality criteria in exemplary (customer) requirements, select, implement and control adequate quality assurance measures, test methods and techniques;
  • select, assemble, and tailor adequate software development processes (e.g., V-Model, SCRUM) including activity, result, roles, and workflow definition for software development and quality assurance (‘Process Tailoring’)

Course contents

  • Basic definitions, basic concepts
  • Basic tools for project planning & monitoring
  • Co-operation in project-teams
  • Project life cycle concepts
  • Act as project-manager in a simulation
  • Basic concepts of quality management, software quality
  • Software test methods and techniques (constructive, analytical quality assurance)
  • Basic concepts of process management, software development processes (V-model, RUP, Agile, ...)

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • H. Brüggemann, Bremer P. (2012): Grundlagen Qualitätsmanagement - Von den Werkzeugen über Methoden zum TQM, Springer Vieweg
  • D. Hoffmann (2013): Software-Qualität, Springer Vieweg
  • H. Kessler, G. Winkelhofer (2004): Projektmanagement: Leitfaden zur Steuerung und Führung von Projekten, Springer Verlag
  • G. Patzak, G. Rattay (2013):Projektmanagement, Linde Verlag
  • Project Management Institute (2013): A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, PMI Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method

6. Semester

Name ECTS
SWS
Module 61 Information and Communicationtechnologies 2 (MOD61)
German / kMod
18.00
-
Internship 2 (BPR)
German / SO
6.00
0.00

Course description

Relevant activities in a vocational context to support entry into professional life. Existing and verifiable vocational activities (if relevant) will be recognized.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • work independently on tasks in an occupational context and to do the required documentation;
  • apply their knowledge and expertise acquired in the course of their studies;
  • reflect the occupational practice in terms of technical, economical, and organizational aspects, as well as from a management and social perspective.

Course contents

  • Internship related

Prerequisites

Internship related

Literature

  • n/a

Assessment methods

  • Successfully / not successfully completed

Anmerkungen

If an internship has to be carried out, Internship 1 and Internship 2 will be combined to a 12 ECTS-point / 8 week full-time-equivalent internship to be carried out in the 3rd year of studies.

Specialization 2 (SPE)
German / SO
12.00
5.00

Course description

Students work in small groups on topics in the field of information and communication technologies relevant to scientific state-of-the-art and industrial practice. This exemplary emphasis builds the practice-oriented foundation for the first bachelor thesis, which is carried out individually by every student.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • familiarize themselves with new topics in a comprehensive and thorough way;
  • apply the knowledge and expertise gained with regard to dedicated problem statements;
  • apply scientific founded, systematic methods of solving problems;
  • write a bachelor thesis with a clear structure and layout, in an elaborate language, and with relevant citations.

Course contents

  • Familiarization with a (new) topic and write the first bachelor thesis

Prerequisites

Topic dependent

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • Topic dependent Learning materials:
  • Topic dependent

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method and approbation of the bachelor thesis

Anmerkungen

Topic selection and forming the student groups usually takes place in the second half of the 4th term.

Module 62 Law (MOD62)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Selected Topics in Law (RKU)
German / UE, FL
6.00
4.00

Course description

This course focuses on selected topics of the Austrian legal system. Examples are e.g. contract law, copyright or data privacy law.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • illustrate and explicate the legal framework (e.g., Austrian legal system, interdependence Austria – European Union);
  • utilize selected web-based legal data-banks in simple cases;
  • deal with simple legal facts of a case and evaluate it in general;
  • assess whether a certain action interferes in the rights of others;
  • by given constellations of contracts assert if certain requirements (e.g., contracting party, configuration of performance) are fulfilled;
  • by given basic conditions (e.g., employment, companies) estimate which legal consequences may arise;
  • illustrate and explicate basic structures of copyright, data privacy law and distance selling legislation.

Course contents

  • Main features of the legal systems of Austria andthe European Union
  • Austrian civil law (especially contract law, employment law and company law)
  • Principles of the Austrian copyright law, data protection law, distance selling law and telecommunications law

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • F. Binder (2013): Das UGB-Firmenrecht, Manz
  • K.-D. Borchardt (2010): Die rechtlichen Grundlagen der Europäischen Union, Facultas.WUV
  • J. Eichinger, L. Kreil, R. Sacherer (2009): Basiswissen Arbeits- und Sozialrecht, Facultas.WUV
  • A. Reif (2014): Neuerungen durch das Verbraucherrechte-Richtlinie-Umsetzungsgesetz, RdW 2014/493
  • M. Walter (2008): Österreichisches Urheberrecht Handbuch, Medien und Recht
  • W. Zankl (2012): Bürgerliches Recht, Facultas.WUVLearning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes
  • W. Brodil, M. Risak, Ch. Wolf (2010): Arbeitsrecht in Grundzügen, LexisNexis
  • W. Feiel, H.-P. Lehofer (2004): Telekommunikationsgesetz 2003, Praxiskommentar zum TKG 2003, Medien und Recht
  • H. Krejci (2010): Privatrecht, Manz
  • I. Lichtenstrasser (2010): Juristische Aspekte der Informatik – Softwareschutz, Skriptum
  • I. Lichtenstrasser (2010): Juristische Aspekte der Informatik – Datenschutzrecht, Skriptum
  • G. Nowotny (2009): Gesellschaftsrecht, Verlag Österreich
  • M. Schwimann (2013): Bürgerliches Recht für Anfänger, LexisNexis
  • H. Stolzlechner (2011): Einführung in das öffentliche Recht, Manz
  • A. Thiele (2011): Europarecht, Niederle-Media

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method and final exam
Module 63 Communication (MOD63)
German / iMod
6.00
-
Business English (BEN)
English / SE
3.00
2.00

Course description

Students engage with global economic and technical developments and their impact on society, and thereby acquire relevant terms and concepts together with the appropriate language skills.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • recognize connections between economic theories and forms of government;
  • analyze the impact of globalization on society and the environment;
  • conduct various forms of business communication.

Course contents

  • Economic concepts and theories
  • Winners and losers of globalization
  • Development of technologies
  • Presenting and negotiating project concepts and business plans
  • Business communication

Prerequisites

- Listening, reading and speaking skills at level C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. - Knowledge and skills necessary to write short scientific papers in English.

Literature

  • Recommendations:
  • M. Duckworth (2003): Oxford Business English, Oxford University Press,
  • I. Mackenzie (2010): English for Business Studies, Cambridge University Press Learning materials:
  • Dedicated scripts and lecture notes
  • O. Maderdonner, et al. (2014): Economy, Technology and Society, Skriptum
  • O. Maderdonner (2014): English for Business, Skriptum

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method
Communication and Conflict Management (KKM)
German / SE
3.00
2.00

Course description

In the course the students reflect on and practice communicative abilities in a vocational context on a scientific basis. Emphasis is placed on conversation techniques and written communication as wll as conflict behaviour and management.

Learning outcomes

After passing this course successfully students are able to ...

  • analyze their own communication and conflict behavior in relation to relevant models (e.g., Schulz v . Thun, Schwarz) and to identify alternatives;
  • make contact with discussion partners (e.g.,rapport) and to find an adequate conversation starter;
  • analyze promotional and disruptive behavior in a conversation on the basis of Transactional Analysis;
  • describe the various stages of a conflict (for example escalation model of Glasl) and the respective handling (e.g., self-help, facilitation, mediation);
  • analyze and to explain situations of conflicts (e.g., "hot" and "cold" conflicts, causes and persons involved).

Course contents

  • Basic theoretical knowledge of communication: Four-sides model and others
  • Verbal and nonverbal communication
  • Conversation promoters, conversation disturbers
  • Question techniques and active listening
  • Handling criticism and difficult situations in conversations
  • Goal-oriented communication
  • Causes and development of conflicts
  • Reflection on personal conflict behavior
  • Types of conflicts and conflict diagnosis

Prerequisites

none

Literature

  • F. Glasl (2008): Selbsthilfe in Konflikten, Verlag Freies Geistesleben/Haupt
  • U. Haeske (2008): Team- und Konfliktmanagement, Cornelsen Verlag
  • F. Schulz von Thun (2009): Miteinander reden – Band 1, Rowohlt
  • G. Schwarz (2005): Konfliktmanagement, Gabler Verlag
  • W. Simon (2007): GABALs großer Methodenkoffer: Grundlagen der Kommunikation, Gabal Verlag
  • Ch. R. Weisbach (2003): Professionelle Gesprächsführung, dtv-Beck Verlag Learning materials:

Assessment methods

  • Course immanent assessment method

Anmerkungen

none