Embedded Systems

AutoHoney(I)IoT

Automated Device Independent Honeypot Generation of IoT and Industrial IoT Devices

The interconnection of physical devices, vehicles, household appliances and other objects with electronics, software, sensors and actuators has become an integral part of our modern lives. The indus- trial sector is also undergoing a change in device communication. Traditionally, automated factories and critical infrastructure were strictly separated from the Internet. However, since the advent of Indus- try 4.0, devices at control as well as supervisor level are frequently connected to the Internet to collect analytic data. The resulting network is called the “Internet of Things” (IoT) and “Industrial Internet of Things” (IIoT). Attackers seek to compromise such interconnected devices with malware campaigns to use them for spam distribution, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, cryptomining, or as an attack vector in Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) attacks. For this reason, interconnected devices are exposed to continuous threats and ongoing attacks. The large set of diverse hardware and soft- ware combined with the neglection of security best practices, such as the use of the same default credentials on all devices, the often non-existent update policies, and the lack of software hardening techniques render IoT and IIoT devices an ideal target for attackers. Many solutions have already been proposed to monitor the Internet for malware infections. So-called “honeypots” are a common practice, but due to the heterogeneity of the devices they are substantially harder to implement in the IoT and IIoT domain than in the field of commodity systems (e.g., desktop computers, smartphones). The heterogeneous landscape of IoT and IIoT devices poses new challenges to the deployment of honeypots that still need to be solved. However, so far no generic honeypot framework exists that is capable of attracting attacks for the wide variety of hardware and software architectures. Our goal is to provide a framework that automatically creates target device tailored honeypots for the (Industrial) Internet of Things which are capable of convincing an adversary that she actually breached a real device instead of a decoy. Our honeypots will be executed in an emulation environment that is able to interact with the outside world over common IoT and IIoT communication channels and allow us to apply fine-grained supervision techniques to monitor an adversary’s behavior throughout his entire attack.

 

Zeitraum

September, 2019 to December, 2021

Fördergeber

Österreichische Forschungsförderungsgesellschaft FFG

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

Projektteam

Matthias Wenzl

DI Mag. Matthias Wenzl

Research & Development, Lecturer
+43-1-3334077-313
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ISaFe

Injecting Security Features into Constrained Embedded Firmware

Within the last decade, emerging use-cases like ``Ambient Assistive Technologies``, ``Car2X`` communication, ``Smart Homes``, ``Smart Cities`` and Industry 4.0 transformed computer systems to ubiquitous companions in our daily lives. The inevitable interconnection of these devices is better known as Internet of Things (IoT). The vast majority of the IoT is made up of computing devices that are highly specialized for their particular purpose. These devices are called embedded systems. Due to their specialization and the thereof resulting constraints such as energy consumption and the deterministic fulfillment of deadlines (real-time requirements), many embedded systems cannot be equipped with a standard operating system for embedded devices like Windows IoT Core, or Linux. As a consequence, a plethora of computers in the IoT lack a sufficient amount of security features that are common in standard operating systems. However, the retrofitting of all available software for embedded systems at a source level is clearly illusive due to the high degree of software (systems with special operating systems, or without operating systems) and hardware diversity (different processor architectures, memory sizes, additional hardware). Therefore, the aim of project ISaFe is to provide automated approaches to implant security features into connected embedded systems to counter the lack of security features in the backbone of the IoT. Together with the IoT startup Riddle & Code, who's aim is to provide an interface between embedded systems and blockchain technology, SBA-Research and the FH Technikum Wien pursue a novel approach based on binary rewriting to retrofit already existing IoT systems in order to make them more resilient against unauthorized access attempts.

Partners: SBA Research gGmbH (LEAD), FH Technikum Wien, Riddle&Code

Zeitraum

September, 2019 to December, 2021

Fördergeber

Österreichische Forschungsförderungsgesellschaft FFG

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

Projektteam

Matthias Wenzl

DI Mag. Matthias Wenzl

Research & Development, Lecturer
+43-1-3334077-313
Call E-Mail

FPGA 4.0

The project FPGA 4.0 deals with special aspects of Field-Programmable Gate Arrays that appeared on the semiconductor market about four decades ago.

One of these special aspects are security issues that are more and more important for a number of everyday life applications. As a prominent example, an ordinary production car was hacked and remotely controlled by two U.S. technicians in 2015. This example also shows how aspects of security as well as functional safety are often heavily intertwined when, e.g., electronic systems engage into such vital car components as brake systems or steering ECUs. At the same time considerations with respect to security and data privacy are soaring and cannot be neglected in future cars. These challenges require radically new approaches and disruptive ideas together with a structured approach of applied research in order to find architectures and technologies that satisfy not only today’s but also future requirements of electronic based systems with respect to security and safety.

FPGAs are basically configurable digital circuits. However, analog components such as ADCs or DACs are also found in today's FPGA devices. Moreover, some semiconductor vendors have developed devices that integrate configurable analog resources on a chip which are sometimes referred to as FPAAs (Field-Programmable Analog Array). As another research goal (besides security aspects) the project FPGA 4.0 investigate how industrial applications can benefit from these analog resources (e.g., in the area of rapid prototyping), compares them with other implementation options as well as evaluates existing limitations.

Through the FPGA 4.0 project the Research Group Embedded Systems at the Department of Electronic Engineering likes to maintain and increase competences in the field of FPGAs in order to attract students for a technical study program and, finally, to provide qualified specialists in the area of engineering to companies in Vienna and its surrounding area.

Zeitraum

November, 2018 to December, 2021

Fördergeber

Stadt Wien

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

Projektteam

Roland Höller

DI Roland Höller

Research & Development, Lecturer
+43-1-3334077-5473
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StudyATHome Internationally

Project description: 
embsys.technikum-wien.at

Zeitraum

February, 2018 to January, 2022

Fördergeber

City of Vienna

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

Projektteam

Martin Deinhofer FHTW

Martin Deinhofer, MSc

Research & Development
+43 1 333 40 77 - 297
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ModuLAAr

Project description: 
embsys.technikum-wien.at

Zeitraum

September, 2012 to August, 2015

Fördergeber

Bundesministeriums für Verkehr, Innovation und Technologie

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

AsTeRICS Academy for Cross-Cultural Education and Research in Assistive Technologies

Project description: 
embsys.technikum-wien.at

Zeitraum

September, 2013 to August, 2016

Fördergeber

Stadt Wien

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

Prosperity4All

Project description: 
embsys.technikum-wien.at

Zeitraum

February, 2014 to January, 2018

Fördergeber

The 7th Framework Programme funded European Research and Technological Development from 2007 until 2013

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

Software Analyse Toolbox

Project description:

embsys.technikum-wien.at

Zeitraum

October, 2013 to March, 2017

Fördergeber

Stadt Wien

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

DIScoVER – Stiftungsprofessur der Stadt Wien

Project description: 

embsys.technikum-wien.at

Zeitraum

September, 2015 to August, 2019

Fördergeber

Stadt Wien

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems

OpenLab

Project description at the Department of Embedded System's website:

embsys.technikum-wien.at

Zeitraum

April, 2015 to March, 2018

Fördergeber

Stadt Wien

Institut

Electronic Engineering

Forschungsschwerpunkt

Embedded Systems & Cyber-Physical Systems